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6

I would like to preface my answer by addressing some misconceptions here. These misconceptions arise from inaccurate or inauthentic understanding of the role of yajna. The concept and practice of yajna has been a central part of the rishi culture since the beginning. The mantras of the Rig Veda samhita are filled with actions of offering raw and cooked food. ...


5

These are understood as northern vs. Southern difference but it actually has to do with the rules of vedic chanting which comes under siksha part of the vedanga. For madhyAndina branch of shukla yajurveda samhita there are many special and unique features such as horizontal hand gestures and double pronunciation and so on Sha , va , ya, refa, etc. Are ...


4

If the Vedas were handed down from God, why would God choose to mention such a mundane and worldly thing in scripture--something that does not concern spirituality but seems firmly rooted in the environment of those who first recorded the Vedas in this age? This is a common dogma of medieval times coming down to modern times. The Vedas are not a monolithic ...


4

Each mantra was revealed by a specific rishi, composed in a particular poetic meter and dedicated to one or more deities. As the Veda is a collection of mantras passed down from the time of the rishis, these attributes (devatA, RShi, chandas) have been an inseparable part of each mantra. Niruktam (7.1-3): यत्काम ऋषिर्यस्यां देवतायामार्थपत्यमिच्छन्स्तुतिं ...


4

We should keep in mind that the idea or concept of Gods or Devas is metaphysical (adhyAtmam). In other words, we cannot think of Devas communicating through a human-like language. Even at a level that is lower than metaphysical, let's call it "theological" (adhidaivatam), the Devas cannot be communicating like humans (adhibhUtam). That's why Rgveda ...


3

Yes indeed. But of course it requires extreme sādhanā and tapas. So much that such people have even revealed new branches of Veda. The most famous story is that of rishi Yājñavalkya, who was cursed by his guru Vaiśampāyana to return all the Vedic learning. After that, he meditated on the Sun and revealed an entire new branch of Vedas, the vājasaneyī saṃhitā, ...


3

Well, I'm aware of at least two instances in Vedas which have the ideas of carrying on doing what you're doing without selfish desire for specific results. In other words, selfless action or Karma Yoga. Rig Veda 5.46.1: हयो न विद्वान् अयुजि स्वयं धुरि तां वहामि प्रतरणीमवस्युवम् । नास्या वश्मि विमुचं नावृतं पुनर्विद्वान् पथः पुरएत ऋजु नेषति ॥ hayo na vidvān ...


2

In Shalya Parva:50 there was a place where humans were slaughtered in sacrifice. He then saw him in the regions of those foremost of men that perform the horse-sacrifice and the sacrifice in which human beings are slaughtered. It is through sacrifices that the high-souled celestials had waxed so wondrously powerful; and having celebrated rites did they ...


2

Both Uvata and Mahidhara (who lived prior to Sayana), who have written commentaries on the Shukla Yajur Veda, explain this verse plainly. In other words, they take the meaning at face value. Uvata: यथेमाम् । यथा इमां वाचं कल्याणीं अनुद्वेजिनीम् । दीयतां भुज्यतामित्येवमादिकाम् । आवदानि जनेभ्योऽर्थाय । के ते जना इत्यत आह । ब्रह्मराजन्याभ्यां ब्राह्मणाय रा...


2

There are many verses in the Samhitā portion of Vedas that have the same message as the Upanishads. In fact, the Samhitā mantras are seeds for the later elaboration in Upanishads. Rig Veda 3.26.7 (rishi Vishvāmitra): अग्निरस्मि जन्मना जातवेदाः घृतं मे चक्षुरमृतं म आसन् । अर्कस्त्रिधातू रजसो विमानो अजस्रो घर्मो हविरस्मि नाम ॥ I am Agni, by birth omniscient, ...


2

Keeping in mind the various points of view expressed in the OP and the comments above, it would be best if we approach this from the point of view of etymology. The word "sarasvatī सरस्वती" etymologically means one who has a lot of speed and flow, from the root dhātu "sṛ सृ". So the word would be originally used to describe a mighty river ...


2

varNa is the philosophical category according to the mode of operation (karma). A detailed analysis of the concept of varNa in Veda & Upanishad is discussed here: https://goldenreed-hiranyayavetasa.blogspot.com/2020/05/first-let-us-look-at-following-passages.html These categories exist all over the world. Until the advent of the industrial age and ...


2

Your are probably looking for Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa 1.2.3.5 (... paśur ha vā eṣa ālabhyate yat puroḍāśaḥ). Kanda I, adhyaya 2, brahmana 3 THE PREPARATION OF THE ALTAR 5. Thereupon the gods ordained this to be the dakṣiṇā at the new- and full-moon sacrifices, to wit, the Anvāhārya mess of rice [3], 'lest the oblation should be without a dakṣiṇā.' That (rinsing ...


1

I suggest you to read more about the concept of Trimurti in Hinduism. The puranas tried to convey the esoteric truths of the Veda in a popular manner. In the process Puranas elevated some Vedic gods by endowing them with virtues, which they loved to see; while at the same time they relegated some other Vedic gods to secondary status. For instance, ...


1

The Upanishad verse in question refers to the Vedas interpreted only ritualistically, as inferior. It does not negate the importance of Vedic knowledge itself. Because we see the same Upanishad talk about the Vedas in high regard. 2.1.6: तस्मादृचः साम यजूंषि दीक्षा यज्ञाश्च सर्वे क्रतवो दक्षिणाश्च From the Atman, came the Rk, Sama, Yajus, consecrations, ...


1

The ideas and the linguistic style of the Purusha Suktam (RV 10.90) are consistent with those of other hymns (such as, for example, Hiranyagarbha Suktam (RV 10.121) and Vishvakarma Suktam (RV 10.81-82)) found in the tenth book of Rig Veda. For example, compare the "सहस्रशीर्षा पुरुषः सहस्राक्षः सहस्रपात्" - "The Purusha has a thousand heads, a thousand ...


1

YES it is possible to learn the Vedas without a Guru, if you let Lord Shiva being your Guru, with the right Devotion. As stated in Shiva Gita 6:20 गुह्योऽहं सर्व वेदेषु आरण्योऽहमजोऽप्यहम्। पुष्करं च पवित्रं च मध्यं चाहमतः परम् । बहिश्चाहं तथा चान्तः पुरस्तादहमव्ययः।। २०।। “I am the hidden secret in all the Vedas;I am the forest and the unborn.I am the ...


1

No, it is not possible to understand the Vedas without an Acharya. Vedas are a very dense subject for students and sadhaks alike. There is bound be mis-interpretations without proper instruction. There are rules regarding recitation, proper pronunciation, swaras etc. So, learning under a Vedic Acharya is a must. Yes, learning sanskrit is necessary.


1

No. Sambara was not killed by Dasaratha at all. He was actually killed by Pradyumna. It says here Pradyumna escaped, and after eventually growing up, killed Sambara and married his wife.


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