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15

Animal sacrifice, when performed properly according to Vedas, is an exception to the general rule about not harming living beings. Here is what Adi Shankaracharya says in his commentary on the Brahma Sutras: We proceed to refute the remark made by the pûrvapakshin that sacrificial works are unholy because involving harm done to animals ... Now from ...


12

Lord Krishna describes eleven types of Yajna (sacrifice) in Bhagvad Geeta. (source is in pdf format). दैवमेवापरे यज्ञं योगिनः पर्युपासते। ब्रह्माग्नावपरे यज्ञं यज्ञेनैवोपजुह्वति।।4.25।। Some yogis perfectly worship the demigods by offering different sacrifices to them, and some of them offer sacrifices in the fire of the Supreme Brahman. 1) Deva ...


8

Soma is indeed an important section of vedas as rightly pointed by you. Soma is also a name of herb/hervs, drink, deity etc. The importance of soma is so much that even the Devas are desperate to drink it. In many vedic sections we see stories and mantras which invite/tempt the celestial gods to come to earth for drinking this divine drink. Over the time ...


8

The Havirdhanas are the two carts used to carry the Soma offerings in Soma Sacrifice from outside to main Place of Yajna . These two carts Havirdhanas are considered as gods. One is Heaven and another is Earth like twins. As described in Satapatha Brahmana . 6 Moreover, the cart represents an abundance; for the cart does indeed represent an abundance:...


7

No, you can not use both yajna and dana for any donation. For any kind of donation where you give something completely to someone else, you can use the word dana but not yajna. Dana and Yajna are two different things. That's why they are mentioned in separate verses. The basic difference is as below: Dana is generally the activity of giving something away ...


7

Yajna, the fire sacrifice, is the central ritual of the Vedic sacrificial cult. The basic idea of Yajna according to the Vedic ritualists was that man can have a happy and prosperous life only if he lived in harmony with his environment, consisting of Nature and the Devas who control the forces of Nature. Man gets his progeny and his sustenance as the gifts ...


7

The answer of your question is given by Shree-Krishna in Shreemad Bhagvat Maha Purana. ( Canto 11 ,Chapter 21 , Shlokas 29-30) SB 11.21: Lord Kṛṣṇa’s Explanation of the Vedic Path. Here ते मे मतमविज्ञाय परोक्षं विषयात्मका:। हिंसायां यदि राग: स्याद् यज्ञ एव न चोदना॥29॥ हिंसाविहारा ह्यालब्धै: पशुभि: स्वसुखेच्छया । यजन्ते देवता यज्ञे: पितृभूतपतीन खला:॥30 ...


6

It is strangled to death, as a sacrificial animal in the yaga ritual. The Shatapatha Brahmana describes in great detail the Vedic rituals regarding; the preparation of altars, ceremonial objects, ritual recitations, and the Soma libation, along with the symbolic attributes of every aspect of the rituals. Following are the excerpts of the ritual of the '...


6

Who is Shudra (or Sudra) A Sudra is not a Sudra by birth alone--nor a Brahmana is Brahmana by birth alone. He, it is said by the wise, in whom are seen those virtues is a Brahmana. And people term him a Sudra in whom those qualities do not exist, even though he be a Brahmana by birth. (Source: Vana Parva: Tirtha-yatra Parva of Mahabharata) A man, may be ...


6

The story of Blue-Eyed Mongoose at Yudhisthira's Ashwamedha Sacrifice is told in detail in Mahabharata - Book 14-Anugita Parva -Chapter 90 . Here the Mongoose is telling us the story of how half of his body turned Golden , just by eating a tiny bit of grain which was given in charity by a kurukshetra Brahmin , but this does not happen in this sacrifice. Thus ...


5

I'm adding a PDF that teaches you the details of how to perform a Chandi Homam.This document also tells you about its importance which i have quoted below. I'm sure that you are just curious to know.If your intent is doing the homam on your own by following this document then that is strongly not recommended.Although this Acharya is genuinely learned in ...


5

The key point here is that it is not possible to (meaningfully) perform the Nachiketa agni ritual without the Bhakti Yoga aspect. The Nachiketa yajna is not like other common yajnas; it's very definition requires the knowledge, contemplation and realization of the indwelling nature of the parabrahman in chit and achit. In other words, this is a bhakti-yoga-...


5

Aswamedha yajna was a royal rite. It was done only by the Kings to spread their glory throughout the world and for the benefit of their kingdom (rāṣṭram vā aśvamedhaḥ). Regarding its origin and usage of horses the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad says: सोऽकामयत: मेध्यं म इदं स्याद् , आत्मन्व्यनेन स्यामिति ततोऽश्वः समभवद् यदश्वत् , तन्मेध्यमभूदिति तदेवा...


5

Yajna can be of many different types. The fourth chapter of Bhagavad Gita lists many of them. But the ones you are referring to are commonly known as fire sacrifices. While yajna generally is the activity of fire sacrifice, the purpose and reason behind doing it can be different. The primary purpose of yajna is to offer oblations to the gods. Now, the ...


5

You are right in surmising that the Putrakaameshthi Yagya may not have been required after the Ashwamedha as mentioned in this verse: चिन्तयानस्य तस्य एवम् बुद्धिः आसीन् महात्मनः | सुतार्थम् वाजिमेधेन किम् अर्थम् न यजामि अहम् || १-८-२ To that anguished great-soul, a thought occurred this way, "To beget sons, why should not I perform Horse ritual...[...


5

I found the answer in this excerpt from Adinatha's Khechari Vidya, an early Hatha Yoga text dated to the 15th century: [The yogin] should use equal amounts of the pollen of nirgundi, amala and mundi, anointed with sugar, ghee and honey; after a year he destroys grey hair and wrinkles. Nirgundi is the Chinese chastetree, Amala is the Indian gooseberry, ...


5

Your confusion is well warranted since the purpose of both the Yagnyas seems to be the establishment of overlordship over other kingdoms and make them accept the sovereignty of the king performing the ceremony. However there are two major differences in the two rituals: FIRST is that while Rajasuya gives access to heaven as a member of Indra's court, a 100 ...


5

This chapter of the Shatapatha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda describes the animals sacrificed in an Ashwamedha Yagna: For this (day) there are those sacrificial animals--'A horse, a hornless he-goat, and a Gomriga,' fifteen 'paryaṅgyas': the mystic import of these has been explained. Then these wild ones--for spring he seizes (three) kapiñgalas, for ...


5

Can a Sudra perform a Vedic sacrifice? Usually no. Given below are the duties of the 4 Varnas. 1.88. To Brahmanas he assigned teaching and studying (the Veda), sacrificing for their own benefit and for others, giving and accepting (of alms). 1.89. The Kshatriya he commanded to protect the people, to bestow gifts, to offer sacrifices, to ...


5

Full story : Ashwamedha parva section 90 A brahmana family, following uncha-vritthi (a vow where they only collect grains of food fallen on ground, so as to not even hurt the plant while harvesting, just like a pigeon does), is suffering from starving during famine. Finally one day, they happen to get some grains. They divide it up into 4 measures, and ...


4

Let me add the quote from the Vachanamrut (lessons given by Bhagavan Swaminarayan) A similar type of question has been asked to Bhagavan Swaminarayan by the Saints and Munis, while Maharaj (Bhagavan Swaminarayan) was answering question about the Dharma and then the discussion goes on and after that Saints have asked this question: “Mahãrãj, we would like ...


4

He was not saying he was in favor. What he is saying is "knowledge of virtue and vice is derived from the scriptures. The scriptures alone are the source for knowing that such an act is virtuous, and another not virtuous; for merit and demerit are super-sensuous realities and they are not invariable for all space, time, and environment. Any deed that is ...


4

The Purushamedha Yagna does not involve human sacrifice. The Purushamedha Yagna is a mock-human sacrifice where a bunch of humans are tied up, but then released at the end. Here is what this chapter of the Shatapatha Brahmana of the Yajur Veda says: And as to why it is called Purushamedha: The stronghold (pur) doubtless is these worlds, and the Purusha (...


4

Athirathram or Atiratra is one of the seven categories of Soma Yagnas.Athirathram or Atiratra refers to “building up of the fireplace and performed overnight”. Seventeen priests are required for performing the ‘Agni’. The course of time is 12 days. the piling of the altar of Agni is a Srauta ritual of Vedic religion. It is also the world’s oldest surviving ...


4

Yagna produces rain(by satisfying gods) which is a necessity for life on earth, so yagna helps ecosystem/environment to sustain itself. You should look at context, Sri Krishna is showing importance of doing vedic karma/karma-yoga to arjuna(and the whole world). In BG 3.12(context for BG 3.14)Bhagwan Sri Krishna is talking about benefits/good-consequences ...


4

NOTE:This is only a partial answer, an explanation of another viewpoint, which was too large to fit into the comments. The translation that you may have found is for the wrong verse (Did you get it from this link ?). It should belong to verse 12.49, not 12.47. The sanskrit verse is at the right place but the translation is at a different location. The ...


4

PurushMedha Yajna is described in this chapter of Shatapatha Brahmana of YajurVeda and Sarvamedha Yajna is described in this chapter. As per Shatapatha Brahmana both PurushMedha and SarvaMedha can give capacity of encompassing all beings of universe. As described in same chapter of Shatapatha Brahamana, Narayana did PurushaMedha Yajna and encompassed all ...


4

The detail list of all animals, birds and marine creatures which were tied in Yajna-Shala is present in Ashwamedha Prakarana of Vajaseniya samhita of Shukla Yajurveda. The 24 adhyay of Shukla yajurveda samhita is only dedicated for description of those animals and the respected gods for whome they were tied to pole. The creatures mentioned are as follows....


4

This excerpt from the Madhaviya Shankara Digvijaya, the traditional biography of Adi Shankaracharya, describes how Adi Shankaracharya went to Karnataka and encountered the Kapalikas, a Shaivite sect which practiced human sacrifice: After a time, [Adi Shankaracharya] started towards the Karnataka country, but was warned by the king of Vidarbha that those ...


4

According to Vayu Purana, Chapter 71, Shamyu was the son of Brihaspati who has inquired about Pitris and Shraddha to his father. सूत उवाच एतद्वोऽहं प्रवक्ष्यामि पितृसर्गमनुत्तमम्। शंयुः पप्रच्छ यत्पूर्वं पितरं वै बृहस्पतिम्॥ ३७॥ Sūte spoke-I shall talk of the most excellent creation of Pitaras. What Samyu enquired earlier to his father ...


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