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I am currently watching Mahabharat on Hotstar online streaming service and I am very much loving it. I have heard this coronation song first during Bhishm’s coronation, then during Pandu’s coronation and also during Yudhishthir’s in later episodes. I searched on google on who wrote this but couldn’t find it.

Link: The Mahabharata serial coronation song

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  • Thank you for adding a source link. To preserve the pronunciation of the original names, I prefer and firmly believe that they should be spelled exactly the way they should be pronounced. For instance, Ram is pronounced Ram so i think it should be spelled Ram and not Rama. What do you think? – 01000001 Mar 6 at 18:50
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  • Part 2: I’m assuming you don’t know all this hence helping you out (if you do please ignore). When someone answers and the asker is satisfied with the answer he clicks on the tick (✔️) below the voting arrows. And if anyone likes the Q or answer, he contributes an upvote by pressing the up arrow on the post( like i upvoted yours) – Archit Mar 6 at 18:55
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    Okay sorry for the Bhashan. Now coming to your Rama and all. We North Indians (presuming you’re one since you raised the doubt :)). We say Ram. Actually it’s Rama. Not Raaaamaaaaaa but Raama. Means in Sanskrit the अ is pronounced not suppressed. राम is रा और म not राम् (with the halant). It’s not रामा but it’s राम. The अ of म is pronounced. Hence युधिष्ठिर would in sanskrt be Yudhishthira not Yudhishthiraaaa but Yudhishthira. But we’ll it’s your question so in case you want to do the Hindi (influenced by Urdu) way it’s your choice :) – Archit Mar 6 at 18:57
  • I see that makes more sense, pardon me for not knowing this in detail. So you actually add A while you spell it but you don’t pronounce it, is that right? – 01000001 Mar 6 at 20:18
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No one wrote it. The mantra mentioned is actually a mantra used for ‘Mantra Puṣpāñjali’ or offering flowers to a god after a puja or Aarti.

This mantra is from the Taittirīya Ārāṇyaka (Kṛṣṇa Yajurveda) Prapāṭhaka 1 Anuvāka 31 Mantra 6:

राजाधिराजाय प्रसह्यसाहिने। नमो वैश्रवणाय कुर्महे। स मे कामान्कामकामाय मह्यम्। कामेश्वरो वैश्रवणो ददातु। कुबेराय वैश्रवणाय। महाराजाय नमः।

rājādhirājāya prasahyasāhine। namo vaiśravaṇāya kurmahe। sa me kāmānkāmakāmāya mahyam। kāmeśvaro vaiśravaṇo dadātu। kuberāya vaiśravaṇāya। mahārājāya namaḥ।

Meaning (from Kamakoti): King of kings, we praise thee,Who is the giver of all victories,Who is the fulfiller of all desires, Please bless me with wealth,To fulfill all our desires,Oh, Kubera, we praise thee, Salutations to the king of kings.

Accented text:
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